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College of Information and Communications

Research Roundup

Each month, the CIC recognizes faculty and graduate student excellence by compiling a list of all publications, grants, awards and more.

2022

AWARDS/GRANTS

ALI ZAIN

Mass Communication and Society Travel Grant: To attend 105th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Conference in Detroit, MI (1,000 USD) 

ALI ZAIN

First Place Moeller Student Paper Award: For presenting ”Moralization in Polarized Debate on COVID-19 Vaccination: Human-AI Collaborative Analysis of Tweets” at 105th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference (including 250 USD cash prize and waiver of conference registration fee worth 200 USD)


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Citation: Edrington, C. (2022). Can You Hear Me Now? How #ShareTheMicNow used Dialogue and Collaboration to Amplify the Voices of Black Women. In J. Katz Jameson & M. Hannah (Ed.), Volume I Contemporary Trends in Conflict and Communication: Technology and Social Media (pp. 91-108). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110687262-007

Abstract: The first half of 2020 proved to be very busy as Americans were forced to tackle two pandemics: COVID-19 and racism. While COVID-19 began in other countries before making its way to the U.S., the racial injustices that were taking place in the United States sparked unprecedented protests around the globe. The stay-at-home orders established due to the COVID-19 pandemic forced citizens to not only take a break, but to take inventory of the harsh realizations lived by African Americans every day. Three deaths of unarmed Black people (Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd) over the span of a few months prompted a resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement both online and offline. Although the deaths of Arbery and Floyd received much attention from the media, Taylor’s death was not publicized nearly as much. The lack of media attention surrounding Taylor’s death, in comparison to both Arbery and Floyd, illuminated the intersectional invisibility of Black women and their voices. Created for the purpose of amplifying the voices of Black women, Bozoma Saint John initiated the #SharetheMicNow campaign. This campaign suggested that relationships between White women of power and Black women are a step in the right direction in the fight for social justice. The goal of this chapter is to highlight how White women of celebrity stature allowed Black women activists and celebrities to take over their Instagram accounts for a day to discuss their social justice efforts and to share how others could get involved. Using a case study approach, this chapter seeks to reveal how the #SharetheMicNow campaign used technology to promote dialogue and collaboration during a time of heightened awareness of racial injustice.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110687262-007


CONFERENCE PAPER

ALI ZAIN and JACOB LONG (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Zain, A. and Long, J. (2022, August). Countering online misinformation: testing impact of state sponsorship labels on message credibility, verification intention and behavior. 105th Annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Exploring efficacy of state-sponsored media labels to counter misinformation on social media, this study found such labels had significant effect on behavioral tendency to visit verified information. However, the effect on message credibility and verification intention was statistically insignificant. Label’s effect also remained the same across mainstream social media platforms. Results showed that effect of label on accessing verified information did not mediate through message credibility and verification intention, indicating participants exclusively relied on heuristic cues to make a behavioral decision as suggested by the Heuristic Systematic Model.

ALI ZAIN

Citation: Zain, A. (2022, August). Spiral of silence 50 years later: conceptual and empirical new directions. 105th Annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Building on 50-year research on spiral of silence, this study reviews extant literature to understand how the SOS has enabled researchers to explain public opinion in contemporary new media environment. The review suggests that digital media technologies not only provide opportunities to directly study SOS phenomena including selective exposure, fear of isolation, and anti-spiraling but also test key assumptions of this framework using sophisticated quantitative and computational methods. Potential future directions of research are discussed.

ALI ZAIN

Abstract: This study investigates moralization in polarized opinions about COVID-19 vaccines. It classified tweets into anti- and pro-vaccination and compared their moral foundations, topics, emotions, and sentiments, using human-AI collaborative analysis. Findings showed that anti- and pro-vaccination tweets were more likely to carry vice and virtue moral foundations, and specifically authority/subversion and loyalty/cheating, respectively. Topics, emotions, and sentiments also differed between anti- and pro-vaccination tweets. Findings signify use of moralization to understand debates surrounding healthcare issues.

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

CITATION: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., & Hobbs, A. (2022, July 26-29). Supporting library staff in Emergencies and natural disasters [Poster presentation]. To be presented at the 87th IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract: Society today expects libraries to be information service providers and serve as catalysts for community engagement. The mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation, preservation, and dissemination. When the pandemic began, many libraries closed their doors, yet they took the opportunity to transform their services to various types of formats and continue the provision of essential information and innovative services to their user communities. This poster covers and shares examples of how librarians have stepped up to being leaders in the communities they serve, especially focusing on how librarians have gone far beyond to provide non-traditional library services to their communities, during the pandemic and beyond. It addresses the significance of creating diversified workforce in libraries, as well as how to integrate equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the libraries' strategic plans. The poster also highlights leadership qualifications in times of crisis, taken from the results of three situation-specific studies on the provision of disaster health-information services by public libraries. Additionally, tips for community engagement will be shared based on results from several information professionals from several different countries.

LUCILIA GREEN, JENNA SPIERING (iSchool Faculty), and JESSELYN BOWMAN DREESZAN (iSchool PhD Student)

Citation: Spiering, J., Bowman, J. D., & Green, L. (2022). A systematic review of K-12 LGBTQIA+ school and public library research. International Association of School Librarianship International Conference, Columbia, SC.

Abstract: To date, an exhaustive examination of LGBTQIA+ topics in international school and public library research has not been conducted. Studies on the topic tend to privilege North American library settings, and are frequently based on previous works published in English, often not considering the varied contexts and cultural issues at play in different countries. The IFLA School Library Guidelines clearly state “school libraries around the world, in their many forms, share a common purpose: the enhancement of teaching and learning for all;” a statement based on a core IFLA value, “the belief that people, communities, and organizations need universal and equitable access to information, ideas and works of imagination for their social, educational, cultural, democratic, and economic well-being” (Schultz-Jones and Oberg, 2015, p. 12). Such inclusivity in school library practice is bolstered by inclusivity in school and children's library research. The study significantly contributes to school and children's library practice by aggregating and presenting school and public library research on LGBTQIA+ students, communities, policies, and issues in an accessible and thematic manner. It further contribute to school and children's library research in two ways: a) by identifying gaps in school and public library research on LGBTQIA+ topics that need to be addressed, and b) by highlighting both problematic and successful approaches, settings, procedures and methodologies in the examination of LGBTQIA+ topics and populations.

LUCILIA GREEN

This session brings together a collection of presentations highlighting the ways libraries in different communities have harnessed the healing power of reading and literacy in partnership with music, art and other creative efforts, to enable community healing and well-being; reading for the heart, the mind and the soul.

Citation: Green, L. (July, 2022). Music + literacy for children at your library. IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Link: https://iflawlic2022.abstractserver.com/program/#/details/sessions/134

SABRINA HABBIB

Paper presented at AEJMC Detroit, 2022.

Citation: Habib, S.; Vogel, T.; Villegas, J.: (2022) Mind the Gap: Are Societal and Technological Changes Reflected in the Advertising Curriculum? AEJMC National Convention, Detroit, MI.

SABRINA HABBIB

Paper presented at Creativity Conference, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR.

Citation: Thorne, E., Habib, S.; Vogel, T., (2022) Teaching Towards Creative Agency. Creativity Conference, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR.

Abstract: Developing students‚ creative agency is a delicate balance of providing enough creative constraints to scaffold learning while allowing students the freedom to determine their creative process and build creative confidence through trial and error. There are many challenges to prioritizing creative agency within an educational paradigm that was built for passive delivery of instruction including shifting student mindsets, balancing power dynamics, assessment of individualized learning, or limited resources and time needed for project-based learning.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

ALI ZAIN, JUNGMI JUN (SJMC Faculty), MARY ANN FITZPATRICK (SJMC Faculty), and NANLAN ZHANG (PhD Alumna)

Citation: Jun, J., Fitzpatrick, MA., Zain, A. and Zhang, N. (2022). Have e-cigarette risk perception and cessation intent of young adult users changed during the Pandemic? American Journal of Health Behaviors, 46 (3), 304-314(11). https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

Abstract: Objectives: Emerging evidence indicates that young adults who use e-cigarettes can withhold greater exposure to COVID-19 risk. We examine how young e-cigarette users perceive COVID-19 related threat of e-cigarette use and benefit of cessation as compared to traditional ones, applying the health belief model. We investigate changes of such perceptions during the pandemic and their associations with past attempt and future intent to quit e-cigarette use. Methods: We collected responses from US young adults (aged 18-25) who have used e-cigarettes in the past month by conducting 2 waves of online surveys in 2020 (wave 1, N=165) and 2021 (wave 2, N=347). Results: Young e-cigarette users in wave 2 reported greater estimates of COVID-19 and traditional threat as well as COVID-19 and traditional benefit of quitting than wave 1. However, we also found significant increases of e-cig dependence, perceived barriers of quitting, and the percentage of young e-cigarette users (33%) who had never attempted to quit in the past month. Importantly, a COVID-19 benefit of cessation and efficacy of quitting were significantly associated with cessation intent. Conclusions: Ongoing efforts are required to track post-pandemic e-cigarette risk perceptions and behaviors, as well as to identify strategies to mitigate increased dependence and usage of e-cigarettes.

Link: https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

AMIR KARAMI, SPRING B. CLARK (iSchool alumna), ANDERSON MACKENZIE (iSchool Alumna), DORATHEA LEE (Honors College), MICHAEL ZHU (Honors College), HANNAH R. BOYAJIEFF (Honors College), and BAILEY GOLDSCHMIDT (Honors College)

Citation: Karami, A., Clark, S. B., Mackenzie, A., Lee, D., Zhu, M., Boyajieff, H. R., & Goldschmidt, B. (2022). 2020 US presidential election in swing states: Gender differences in Twitter conversations. International Journal of Information Management Data Insights, 2(2), 100097.

Abstract: Social media is commonly used by the public during election campaigns to express their opinions regarding different issues. Among various social media channels, Twitter provides an efficient platform for researchers and politicians to explore public opinion regarding a wide range of topics such as the economy and foreign policy. Current literature mainly focuses on analyzing the content of tweets without considering the gender of users. This research collects and analyzes a large number of tweets and uses computational, human coding, and statistical analyses to identify topics in more than 300,000 tweets posted during the 2020 U.S. presidential election and to compare female and male users regarding the average weight of the discussed topics. Our findings are based upon a wide range of topics, such as tax, climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of the topics, there exists a significant difference between female and male users for more than 70% of topics.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2667096822000404

JABARI EVANS

Citation: Evans, J. M. (2022). Exploring Social Media Contexts for Cultivating Connected Learning with Black Youth in Urban Communities: the case of Dreamer Studio. Qualitative Sociology, DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09514-6.

Abstract: Using the Connected Learning framework as a conceptual lens, this study utilizes digital ethnographic methods to explore outcomes of a Hip-Hop Based Education program developed to provide music related career pathways for Chicago youth. Using the narratives of the participants within the program, I draw on participant observation online and in-depth interviews collected to explore the link between the tenets of Connected Learning and digital participation in this artistic community of practice. I explore participants’ work within social media platforms toward building their creative skill, cultivating a public voice, connecting to mentors and communication that strengthens the social bonds within their peer community. This study’s findings affirm prior studies that suggest late adolescence is an important time frame where children are developing social identities online in affinity spaces, but in ways that are tied to civic engagement, self-empowerment and critical skill development for their future pathways. To conclude, I suggest that investigating participant activity on social media platforms as a part of field work can help ethnographers to better connect their impact to the agency and life trajectories of their youth participants.

JUNGMI JUN, MARY ANNE FITZPATRICK (SJMC Faculty), ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. Student), and NANLAN ZHANG (SJMC Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Jun, J., Fitzpatrick M. A., Zain, A. & Zhang, N. (2022). Have e-cigarette risk perception and cessation intent of young adult users changed during the pandemic? American Journal of Health Behaviors. 46(3), 303-313. DOI: 10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9.

Abstract: Objectives: Emerging evidence indicates that young adults who use e-cigarettes can withhold greater exposure to COVID-19 risk. We examine how young e-cigarette users perceive COVID-19 related threat of e-cigarette use and benefit of cessation as compared to traditional ones, applying the health belief model. We investigate changes of such perceptions during the pandemic and their associations with past attempt and future intent to quit e-cigarette use. Methods: We collected responses from US young adults (aged 18-25) who have used e-cigarettes in the past month by conducting 2 waves of online surveys in 2020 (wave 1, N=165) and 2021 (wave 2, N=347). Results: Young e-cigarette users in wave 2 reported greater estimates of COVID-19 and traditional threat as well as COVID-19 and traditional benefit of quitting than wave 1. However, we also found significant increases of e-cig dependence, perceived barriers of quitting, and the percentage of young e-cigarette users (33%) who had never attempted to quit in the past month. Importantly, a COVID-19 benefit of cessation and efficacy of quitting were significantly associated with cessation intent. Conclusions: Ongoing efforts are required to track post-pandemic e-cigarette risk perceptions and behaviors, as well as to identify strategies to mitigate increased dependence and usage of e-cigarettes.

Link: https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.46.3.9

LAURA SMITH, ERIC ROBINSON, and CARMEN MAYE

Citation: Smith, L.K., Robinson, E. & Maye, C. (2022). Improving Assessment Results: Experimenting With Data Collection Methods in a Law & Ethics Course. Journal of Media Education (publication pending, July edition).

Abstract: This three-year project sought to determine what method is best for collecting posttest data and better measure what students are actually learning in a given course. It explores learning outcomes within a Law & Ethics course in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. Students demonstrate knowledge on key concepts in one of two conditions: (1) an optional, semester-ending quiz that students take to help them prepare for the class final, or (2) on questions embedded within a final exam. Findings show students perform significantly better in the second condition, suggesting that students score higher when more “weight” is attached to their ultimate performance. Findings were duplicated in years two and three of the project, providing a path to more reliable and valid assessment data in the SJMC.

Link: https://en.calameo.com/journal-of-media-education/read/000091789683f3a469a55

LUCILIA GREEN and DR. KAREN CHASSEREAU (Candler County Schools)

Citation: Green, L., & Chassereau, K. (in press). Modeling guided inquiry and school librarian instructional partnerships to pre-service teachers through digital video production. Journal of Education for Library & Information Science. Advanced Access.

Abstract: The last ten years in school library research reflect an expanded definition of information literacy along with a stronger emphasis on in-depth information literacy development, concluding that a fundamental shift in instruction provided by school librarians is needed; one that not only helps students find information, but develops students’ abilities to interact with, and learn from information, engaging with it in critical ways. Collaboratively designed and implemented through an instructional partnership between the school librarian and a classroom teacher, Guided Inquiry instruction helps students gain meaningful understanding and develop a personal perspective by exploring, comparing, and contrasting multiple information sources. Despite the frequently touted benefits of instructional partnerships between school librarians and classroom teachers, these structures are rarely, if ever, modeled by school library and pre-service teacher educators. This study examined the process and challenges inherit in designing and modeling Guided Inquiry units of instruction, through a school librarian instructional partnership model, in pre-service teacher education, exploring its impact on teacher candidate willingness to identify school librarians as co-teachers. Findings from the present study indicate Guided Inquiry units co-taught by school library educators and teacher educators help teacher candidates both successfully navigate the research process and develop a mental model of the school librarian as a co-teacher.

ROBERT MCKEEVER, FRANKWADDELL (Journalism faculty, University of Florida), and HOLLY OVERTON (former SJMC faculty)

Citation: Waddell, T.F., Overton, H., & McKeever, R. (in press). Does Sample Source Matter for Theory? Testing Model Invariance with the Influence of Presumed Influence Model across Amazon Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics Panels. Computers in Human Behavior

Abstract: Online data collection services are increasingly common for testing mass communication theory. However, how consistent are the theoretical tenets of theory when tested across different online data services? A pre-registered online survey (N = 1,546) examined the influence of the presumed influence model across subjects simultaneously recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics Panels. Results revealed that model parameters were mostly consistent with the IPI theory regardless of data source. Methodological implications are discussed.

PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (iSchool Grad Student)

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, July 26-29). Fighting an infodemic through accurate, intelligible COVID-19 Information: An analysis of the readability level of authoritative online consumer health information. To be presented at the 87th IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract: Since the beginning of 2020, the COVID-19 virus and its variants have affected lives worldwide and have advanced a mistrust of science. The World Health Organization points out that global health professionals, public health professionals, and information professionals have fought not only against this rapidly evolving virus but against an infodemic as well. Because uncertainty, fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, the public needs access to accurate information and clear, specific instructions to help them act appropriately. Therefore, source credibility is key to successful risk communication.

During this public health crisis, people must be able to identify and access specific and comprehensible information in order to protect themselves and their families. Individuals need information that is easy to understand, makes sense based on their knowledge, is convenient to access, and is easy to use. Also, it must be accurate and come from authoritative sources to aid in behavior changes and health decision-making. Public health experts suggest that a critical component of source credibility is the use of multiple channels, including Internet portals, to disseminate reliable information to those who need it. Therefore, the Internet is a major source for publishing, disseminating, and accessing massive lay- and professional-oriented COVID-19 information because of its 24/7 availability and easy access.

This study examines the Flesch-Kincaid grade levels of the COVID-19 consumer health information in English published by credible sources (for example, public health agencies) shared on the websites of the public library systems of the twenty largest cities in the U.S. It investigates whether the information provided by these authoritative organizations can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public in the U.S. This content analytical study examines the reading level of the resources to see if they are compatible with the guidelines of the American Medical Association for patient education materials (i.e., at a sixth-grade level). The results show that the documents reviewed in the study are not compatible with this reading level. Information provided by authoritative sources must be made easy to understand and access, or it cannot support the fight against the current infodemic. Communication professionals, public health professionals, and information professionals must monitor online COVID-19 consumer health information to assess whether the general public can easily access it and use it for evidence-based problem-solving. Health information specialists must promote the concept of accessing credible information published by authoritative sources by partnering with public librarians to deliver health information literacy-related courses to their users.

KAREN GAVIGAN

Presented a session at the International Association of School Librarian's Conference: The session was entitled Never Forget: Using Graphic Novels to Teach Students about the Holocaust

 SHANNON BOWEN

Citation: Governmental Use of Social Media and AI during Disasters, Crises, and Emergency Response, paper presented at BledCom, Slovenia, July 2, 2022

Abstract: Introduction and Purpose. This paper explores the conference theme of whether social media could use a reboot in communicating with stakeholders during disasters, crises, or emergencies. To some extent, this “re-boot” is not optional: it is happening due to rapid changes in technology such as AI and machine learning, and due to social changes and pressures from the sustained crisis of the global Covid-19 pandemic. Literature Review: This study examines the literature of issues management in crises, emergency, and disaster management, as well as government and public affairs, ethics of governmental relations, and applications of artificial intelligence in communication and social media use. RQ: This paper asks, to what extent are public affairs officers (PAOs) - or Public Information Officers (PIOs) - using social media, advanced computational methods, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help manage crises, emergencies, and disasters? Method: Data collection and analyses is still ongoing: Two focus groups and 8 in-depth interviews with 40 PAOs working in governmental agencies were conducted to understand how social media is used during a crisis, the extent to which misinformation interferes with accurate information, and the potential for AI application in optimizing efficiencies during a crisis or natural disaster. Limitations and Suggestions for Future Research. Hurricane response was used as an example in a coastal southeastern state in the USA. This research is illustrative of response in that state but due to variances in states and governing structures, and across nationalities, the conclusions should not be applied to other areas without further study. Future studies could compare and contrast other states, public sector organizations, and nationalities in use of social media and AI in emergencies. Results and Conclusions: Officials detailed the extent to which they used different social media platforms during such an emergency, how media relations takes place, how misinformation is handled (from honest mistakes to maleficent bad actors), and how citizen-stakeholders are communicated with via social media during crises. Participants want an AI that can show sentiment analysis, monitor news sources, measure the reach of their own messages disseminated via social media, and find problematic or incorrect information. Currently, research, data analytics, and AI are little-used in governmental public affairs, especially during crises. This finding shows a need for formative and evaluative research, as well as a potential for marked improvement in efficiencies via AI applications. Practical and social implications. PAOs/PIOs could have a revolutionized ability to identify information reach, flows, provenance, and authenticity as well as to address misinformation on social media via the use of AI. As a computer science team develops the AI supporting this research, the use of AI and machine learning will be tested which can speed the efficiency and accuracy of responses to hurricanes and other crises/disasters. Emergency management could be improved in numerous ways and used in many locales.

SHANNON BOWEN

Presented "Co:Cast Crisis Observatory" as the Human-Centered Design Lead, National Science Foundation Expo, Washington DC

VANESSA KITZIE, JESSELYN DREESZEN BOWMAN (iSchool PhD Student), and KATHIA VALVERDE (Arnold School, Center for Community Health Alignment)

Citation: Kitzie, V., Valverde, K., & Dreeszen Bowman, J. (2022). Developing an LGBTQIA+ specialization for Community Health Worker (CHW) training. Poster to be presented at the National LGBTQ+ Health Conference, Chicago, IL, July 28-30.

Abstract: LGBTQ+ populations experience significant barriers to obtaining affirming healthcare. One key barrier is informational, as LGBTQ+ persons find it challenging to learn about their health needs, know what medical professionals to trust, and navigate healthcare systems. These difficulties are the byproducts of LGBTQ+ people left out of formal knowledge production centered on their health issues and needs. This project addresses these inequities by training and certifying LGBTQ+ people as Community Health Workers (CHWs).

CHWs act as critical intermediaries between healthcare systems and their communities, often underserved and experiencing health challenges. CHWs promote community health via outreach, community education, informal counseling, social support, and advocacy. CHW training allows participants to develop the necessary skills to implement these interventions and community action for health promotion. Training functions as an important way to bring LGBTQ+ people to the forefront of conversations in formal spaces like healthcare systems.

Per these acknowledged needs and benefits of CHW training, the project team recruited a cohort of 11 LGBTQ+ community leaders from across South Carolina (SC). SC LGBTQ+ residents experience more severe health challenges than national averages. The cohort received foundational CHW training to enhance core competencies relevant to the emerging CHW profession. The training was facilitated in a participatory learning format focused on sharing the lived experience of training participants and included 161 hours of learning content. Participatory learning allows long-term information retention and application while developing skills in the field instead of short-term retention of theoretical information that may go unapplied.

After completing foundational training, this same cohort participated in a 30-hour pilot specialization training for CHWs working with LGBTQ+ people. The training explored unique approaches that could serve LGBTQ+ people while considering the cultural humility necessary to navigate intersectional identities outside the LGBTQ+ umbrella. In addition, the cohort built upon and shared their lived experiences to substantiate the curriculum for future cohorts who may have less knowledge on the given topic.

Qualitative evaluation results from the cohort indicated that the combination of foundational and specialty track training allowed them to (a) critically think about their experiences, (b) contribute to training for future peers and allies, and (c) develop skills to apply in their respective communities in the following ways: Using training materials when engaging with health professionals. Developing a community resource guide to support community members. Engaging in advocacy work for trans-inclusive birthing centers in SC. Developing sustained networking opportunities. Further, CHWs at large have expressed interest in taking future iterations of the training to more effectively and inclusively conduct community health work. Significant lessons learned include: Providing a platform to intentionally foster sustained community connections. Providing a neutral party for CHWs to communicate concerns. Emphasizing the need for LGBTQIA+ CHWs because of the context they provide based on lived experience and specialized training.

While many lessons were learned, the CHW field, especially as it relates to serving LGBTQ+ populations, still holds unexplored avenues. The information collected from this experience can serve as a solid foundation for those that wish to build upon them. 


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

SHANNON BOWEN

Integration of several recent papers and 1 ongoing project to determine ethics of strategically managing issues with/for stakeholders during difficult times (such as the pandemic, natural disasters, DEI, terrorism, war, and social unrest).

Citation: Strategy under uncertainty: How U.S. organizations respond to socio-political challenges, new ethical and political research perspectives. Keynote presented at BledCom, Slovenia, July 2, 2022

OTHER

ALI ZAIN

Accepted to CHQ Junior Scholar Program (2022-23), an extensive research traineeship offered by the SC SmartState Center for Health Quality to apply computational methods for research at the interaction of public health and social media ($3,000 worth research support + up to $1,500 travel grant)

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

I will moderate one of the discussion topics for the IFLA Evidence for Global Disaster Health (E4GDH) SIG Open Session: Librarians as Evidence Intermediaries During Times of Crisis.

LUCILIA GREEN

Dr. Lucy Santos Green was voted President-Elect of The Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE). ALISE is the global leader in education for the information profession, promoting innovative, high-quality education for the information professions internationally through engagement, advocacy and research. ALISE is a non-profit organization that serves as the intellectual home of faculty, staff, and students in library and information science, and allied disciplines.

Link: https://ali.memberclicks.net/alise-election-2022-santos-green

AWARDS/GRANTS

JABARI EVANS

I was recently awarded an Innovative Pedagogy Grant from the Center for Teaching Excellence for my newly designed course, Jour 309: Hip-Hop, Media and Society.

Instead of solely relying on a textbook, I am utilizing a producing podcast episodes that will serve similar to required readings. This not only will allow the course to cater to different modes of learning but also will exclusive access to gatekeepers in the Hip Hop music industry.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

 VANESSA KITZIE and JENNA SPIERING

Citation: Santos Green, L., Spiering, J., Kitzie, V., & Erlanger, J. (2022). LGBTQIA+ inclusive children’s librarianship: Queer-positive policies, programs, and practices. (approx. 75,000-word book). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Abstract: This book breaks new ground, offering school and public librarians serving children in grades K–8 a roadmap for implementing and upholding queer-inclusive programs, policies, and services. School and public librarians are serving ever greater numbers of LGBTQIA+ children and families. Transgender children may begin to express a strong sense of gender identity as early as 2–3 years of age. Children are also identifying as gay much sooner than earlier generations—often between the ages of 7 and 12. Additionally, more children than ever before are living with LGBTQIA+ caregivers. In seeking to make our programs and services inclusive and equitable for these growing populations, librarians may court controversy and face community backlash from patrons who feel queer-inclusive content is inappropriate for young children. This book codifies a set of best practices for librarians as they rise to this challenge, defining queer-inclusive programs, identifying potential barriers to implementation, and offering strategies and resources to overcome them.

Link: https://www.abc-clio.com/products/a6348p/

BOOK REVIEW

 ERIC ROBINSON

A review of Eric Robinson's Cyber Law and Ethics: Regulation of the Connected World, co-written with Mark Grabowski of Adelphi University, said that the internet law textbook "helps nonlawyers understand the general issues" and is a "noteworthy addition[] for any journalism and media communication professor seeking fresh ideas and instructional paths."

Citation: Lipschultz, J. H. (2022). Noteworthy Books. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator. https://doi.org/10.1177/10776958221097242

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/10776958221097242


CONFERENCE PAPER

CARL CICCARELLI (SJMC PhD student), BROOKE MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Conference paper accepted to AEJMC: Empathy and the Health Belief Model in the Context of COVID-19

Citation: Ciccarelli, C., McKeever B., & McKeever, R. (2022, August). Empathy and the Health Belief Model in the Context of COVID-19. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Detroit, MI.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

BROOKE MCKEEVER and other faculty/grad students from the Arnold School of Public Health

Citation: Zhang, R., Qiao, S., McKeever, B. W., Olatosi, B., & Li, X. (2022). Listening to Voices from African American Communities in the Southern States about COVID-19 Vaccine Information and Communication: A Qualitative Study. Vaccines, 10(7), 1046. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071046

Abstract: The high uptake of COVID-19 vaccines is one of the most promising measures to control the pandemic. However, some African American (AA) communities exhibit vaccination hesitancy due to mis- or disinformation. It is important to understand the challenges in accessing reliable COVID-19 vaccine information and to develop feasible health communication interventions based on voices from AA communities. We conducted 2 focus group discussions (FGDs) among 18 community stakeholders recruited from 3 counties iSouth Carolina on 8 October and 29 October 2021. The FGDs were conducted online via Zoom meetings. The FGD data were managed and thematically analyzed using NVivo 12. Participants worked primarily in colleges, churches, and health agencies. We found that the challenges of accessing reliable vaccine information in AA communities primarily included structural barriers, information barriers, and a lack of trust. Community stake- holders recommended recruiting trusted messengers, using social events to reach target populations, and conducting health communication campaigns through open dialogue among stakeholders. Health communication interventions directed at COVID-19 vaccine uptake should be grounded in ongoing community engagement, trust-building activities, and transparent communication about vaccine development. Tailoring health communication interventions to different groups may help reduce misinformation spread and thus promote vaccination in AA communities in the southern states.

Link: https://mdpi-res.com/d_attachment/vaccines/vaccines-10-01046/article_deploy/vaccines-10-01046.pdf?version=1656519941

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Floegel, D., Barriage, S., & Oltmann, S.M. (2022). How visibility, hypervisibility, and invisibility shape library staff and drag performer perceptions of and experiences with drag storytimes in public libraries. The Library Quarterly: Information, Communication, Policy, 92(3), 215-240.

Abstract: This article uses data from interviews with public library staff and drag performers to understand how discourses surrounding queer visibility, hypervisibility, and invisibility affect library staff members’ and performers’ perceptions of drag storytimes. Informed by interviews with library staff and drag performers, we argue that hypervisibility and invisibility narratives mark drag storytimes as dangerous and trendy and may unduly influence how some library staff members view these events. Conversely, other staff members and drag performers engage in significant tactical emotional and physical labor to recognize these events as inherently queer and powerful critical literacy programs. Understanding how varying degrees of visibility mediate library staff and performer perceptions of and experiences with drag storytimes lends insights into larger narratives centered on queerness and belonging within libraries. Drag performers’ narrative accounts also offer paths by which library staff may work with performers to promote authentic queer visibility.

Link: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/719915

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Oltmann, S. M., Kitzie, V., & Barriage, S. (2022). “For me, it is an intellectual freedom issue”: Drag storytimes, neutrality, and ALA core values. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/09610006221100853

Abstract: Drag storytimes are increasingly popular programing events in which drag performers lead storytime in public libraries or other settings; they have been both popular and contentious. In this study, we utilized data from a national survey of 458 library staff and 26 subsequent interviews to investigate connections between drag storytime, intellectual freedom, neutrality, and other core librarianship values. The data was analyzed inductively and several key themes emerged: hosting drag storytimes is an intellectual freedom stance; various perspectives on the American Library Association stance in support of drag storytimes; connections to other core values; emphasizing diversity to serve one’s community; and contesting the neutrality of libraries. We found difficult-to-reconcile stances of “presenting all sides” and “taking a side,” but we suggest a way forward by focusing on the outcome of collective self-governance (based on core values of intellectual freedom and democracy).

PANEL/PRESENTATION

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)

This is a conference presentation at the Medical library Association's 2022 annual convention. This is a hybrid conference held in both online and onsite formats.

Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, May 2-7). Do your general public users understand the COVID-19 health information you have provided? A content analytical study. To be presented at Medical Library Association Annual Meeting & Exhibition, New Orleans, LA.

Abstract: Objectives Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major health organizations in the U.S., such as the NLM and the Mayo Clinic, have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. These resources published via MedlinePlus and Mayo Clinic have been widely promoted for user access in public libraries. It is essential to examine whether these authoritative COVID-19 health information resources facilitate health information access by adults from the general public. Methods This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed via MedlinePlus and by the Mayo Clinic. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen's everyday life information concepts and Dervin's sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems' websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by the targeted organizations. Results The study examines the reading level of the resources to see if they are compatible with the guidelines of the American Medical Association (AMA) for patient education materials (i.e., at a sixth-grade level). The results show that the documents reviewed in the study are not compatible with this reading level. Information provided via MedlinePlus and the Mayo Clinic must be made easy to understand and access. Conclusions This study shows the readability levels of the commonly used authoritative COVID-19 consumer health information distributed via MedlinePlus and by the Mayo Clinic) are higher than the AMA recommendations for patient education materials. Most of the public libraries and public librarians are not aware of the use of MedlinePlus for user services; education programs must be provided to public librarians and the general public to promote the awareness of MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus Español. Publishers, such as the National Library of Medicine, must strive to lower the readability levels of their COVID-19 consumer health information. Health information professionals need to actively join the force to monitor the readability levels and to produce consumer health information in low grade-level readability on COVID-19, as well as fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and infodemic. Health information professionals need to actively join the force to monitor the readability levels and to produce consumer health information in low grade-level readability on COVID-19, as well as fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and infodemic.


TRAINING PROGRAM

FEILI TU-KEEFNER

I am currently one of the coaches for the "Comprehensive Training for Promotion of Vaccine Demand" posted by GAVI, WHO, UNICEF & US CDC .

Abstract: This program is designed to promote the knowledge and skills to maintain and restore routine immunization and promote COVID-19 vaccination by leveraging social data, behavioral insights, infodemic management, service experience and digital strategies.


TOP DOWNLOADED ARTICLE

AMIR KARAMI and MACKENZIE ANDERSON (iSchool Alumna)

Social media and COVID‐19: Characterizing anti‐quarantine comments on Twitter is among the top 10 most downloaded Wiley papers.

Link: https://asistdl.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/pra2.349

AWARDS/GRANTS

JUNGMI JUN, HOMAYOUN VALAFAR (College of Engineering and Computer Science), JIM THRASHER (Arnold School of Public Health), and FOREST AGOSTINELLI (College of Engineering and Computer Science)

The team received ASPIRE II grant ($99,190) for "Automatic and personalized identification of smoking using smartwatches" from the Office of the Vice President for Research.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

JUNGMI JUN and NANLAN ZHANG (Ph.D. alumna)

Citation: Jun, J. & Zhang, N. (2022). Fight the virus, fight the bias: Asian Americans’ COVID-19 racism experience, health impact, and activism. In S. Navarro and S. Hernandez (Eds). The Color of COVID-19: The Racial Inequality of Marginalized Communities. DOI: 10.4324/9781003268710-8

Link: https://books.google.com/books?id=cx1tEAAAQBAJ&newbks=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PT110&dq=10.4324/9781003268710-8&hl=en&source=newbks_fb#v=onepage&q=10.4324%2F9781003268710-8&f=false 


CONFERENCE PAPERS

TARA MORTENSEN, TAYLOR WEN (SJMC Faculty), COLIN PIACENTINE (SJMC PhD Student), BRIAN MCDERMOTT (University of Massachusetts Amherst Faculty), and NORA BOST (SJMCS Honor Student Alumnus)

Conference paper accepted to AEJMC: An eye-tracking analysis of negative and positive emotional staff and stock photos in the news

Citation: Mortensen, T., Wen, T., Piacentine, C., McDermott, B., Bost, N. (2022, August). An eye-tracking analysis of negative and positive emotional staff and stock photos in the news

Abstract: Scholars have criticized that visual elites merely assume the effects of emotional photojournalistic images, with most of this literature being within the realm of psychology. In the present study, a 2 (stock photo and staff photo) by 2 (positive valence and negative valence) study is conducted to examine audience reactions to emotional images in a news context. Within photojournalism research, audience reactions toward neither of the twin photojournalistic values of emotion and credibility have been well studied. Viewer perceptions are measured through: self-reported arousal levels using three 9-point items on a bipolar scale, credibility perceptions using the previously-developed News Photo Credibility Scale, and visual attention using the eye-tracking measures of fixation duration and fixation count. [Paper presentation]. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Detroit, MI.

TARA MORTENSEN, BRIAN MCDERMOTT (University of Massachusetts Amherst Faculty), and BOB WERTZ (SJMC PhD Student)

Paper accepted to AEJMC: Measuring How Presentational Context and Professional Authorship Affects Credibility Perceptions of News Images

Citation: McDermott, B., Mortensen, T., Wertz, B. 2022, August). Measuring How Presentational Context and Professional Authorship Affects Credibility Perceptions of News Images. [Paper presentation]. Paper to be presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Detroit, MI.

Abstract: Today, photojournalists publish images in news publications as well as social media and images captured by ordinary citizens appear in journalism spaces. This study examines how photo content and context of its publication space influences credibility perceptions. The exceedingly small difference in how respondents rate the credibility of the images suggests that participants in this study are willing to accept newsworthy images as credible on social media, and social media images as credible in the news.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna), DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. alumna), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: McKeever, B. W., Choi, M., Walker, D., & McKeever, R. (2022). Gun violence as a public health issue: Media advocacy, framing and implications for communication. Newspaper Research Journal. https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

Abstract: Following a recent push to reframe gun violence as a public health issue, an online survey (N = 510) helped explore frame salience and frame adoption through the lens of media advocacy. Findings revealed that gun control and gun rights frames are salient, and television, social media and newspapers are the most popular sources of gun violence information. Individuals are being held responsible, while background checks were the most salient and adopted solution among Americans. Three gun rights organizations were the most salient organizations from media coverage related to gun violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

JUNGMI JUN, ALI ZAIN (Ph.D. student), YINGYING CHEN (SJMC Faculty), and SEI-HILL KIM (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Jun, J., Zain, A., Chen, Y., & Kim, S.-H. (2022). Adverse Mentions, Negative Sentiment, and Emotions in COVID-19 Vaccine Tweets and Their Association with Vaccination Uptake: Global Comparison of 192 Countries. Vaccines, 10(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050735

Abstract: Background: Many countries show low COVID-19 vaccination rates despite high levels of readiness and delivery of vaccines. The public’s misperceptions, hesitancy, and negative emotions toward vaccines are psychological factors discouraging vaccination. At the individual level, studies have revealed negative perceptual/behavioral outcomes of COVID-19 information exposure via social media where misinformation and vaccine fear flood. Objective: This study extends research context to the global level and investigates social media discourse on the COVID-19 vaccine and its association with vaccination rates of 192 countries in the world. Methods: COVID-19 vaccine tweets were compared by country in terms of (1) the number per million Twitter users, (2) mentions of adverse events—death, side-effects, blood clots, (3) negative sentiment (vs. positive), and (4) fear, sadness, or anger emotions (vs. joy). Artificial intelligence (AI) was adopted to classify sentiment and emotions. Such tweets and covariates (COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates, GDP, population size and density, literacy rate, democracy index, institutional quality, human development index) were tested as predictors of vaccination rates in countries. Results: Over 21.3 million COVID-19 vaccine tweets posted between November 2020 and August 2021 worldwide were included in our analysis. The global average of COVID-19 vaccine tweets mentioning adverse events was 2% for ‘death’, 1.15% for ‘side-effects’, and 0.80% for ‘blood clots’. Negative sentiment appeared 1.90 times more frequently than positive sentiment. Fear, anger, or sadness appeared 0.70 times less frequently than joy. The mention of ‘side-effects’ and fear/sadness/anger emotions appeared as significant predictors of vaccination rates, along with the human development index. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that global efforts to combat misinformation, address negative emotions, and promote positive languages surrounding COVID-19 vaccination on social media may help increase global vaccination uptakes.

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-393X/10/5/735/htm#B49-vaccines-10-00735

SABRINA HABBIB

Brainstorming in groups can be tricky. This article has research-based suggestions of how to make it work.

Citation: Habbib, S. (2022, May) How to brainstorm brilliant ideas in teams – without sliding into ‘groupthink’. The Conversation.

Link: https://theconversation.com/how-to-brainstorm-brilliant-ideas-in-teams-without-sliding-into-groupthink-180084?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=bylinetwitterbutton 


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Recently, I presented on a panel at the Institute for Public Relations Bridge Conference. This panel discussed the shift from traditional corporate social responsibility (CSR) to corporate social advocacy (CSA) and its implications.

Citation: Shifting from CSR to CSA: Corporate and activist insights for professional communicators. Institute for Public Relations Bridge Conference

Abstract: Companies are increasingly being pressured to engage in public conversations and take stances on polarizing issues—shifting or expanding efforts traditionally thought of as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA). What does this shift mean for corporations and communicators? This panel investigates the CSA shift’s implications from the perspectives of activism, connections to organizational values, and best practices for engagement and messaging in polarizing issue discourse.

LAURA SMITH, DAVID MOSCOWITZ (SJMC Faculty), NINA BROOK (SJMC Faculty), BERTRAM RANTIN (SJMC Faculty), and ERIC ROBINSON (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, March 29). Shoulder-to-Shoulder: Best practices for collaborative assessment. Invited coordinator and presenter on panel about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Center for Teaching Excellence, Columbia, SC.

LAURA SMITH

This talk compared a writing rubric produced by the American Association of Colleges & University to one we're testing here in the SJMC (with Nina Brook and Bertram Rantin in our foundational writing course, J291).

Citation: name of your publication, where it was published, etc.)

Smith., L.K. (2022, April 19) Applying Value rubrics to journalistic writing in entry-level communications courses. Invited panelist on "Adding VALUE to Broadcast Education: An Introduction to AAC&Us VALUE Rubrics" at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.

LAURA SMITH

Each year, BEA hosts a half-day bootcamp about assessment practices across the country. I've been invited to participate for the last several years. This year, I presented data for an experiment we're conducting in our JOUR 303 law classes to determine whether students perform better when we assess student learning in optional quiz at the end of the semster versus embed the questions in the final exam. I presented results from three years of study. Thanks to Eric Robinson and Carmen Maye for their consistent and collegial work on this project!

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, April 20). Invited presenter, Assessment Bootcamp at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.

LAURA SMITH

Executing a successful assessment plan can be challenging enough. For many, Covid made our efforts that much harder. In some programs, data collection ceased completely. In others, the Covid crisis led to new and creative ways to collect the data. Panelists addressed some of the experiences they’ve had collecting data in the past two years and adaptations they’ve been forced to make – adaptations they embrace and may event stick with in the future. Panelists included Marquita Smith, Asst. Dean of Graduate Programs @ Ole Miss, Mary Jackson-Pitts, Professor @ Arkansas State and Robert Spicer, Associate Professor @ Millersville (PA) University.

Citation: Smith, L.K. (2022, April 23). Assessment in a time of Covid: Concerns and Opportunities. Panel producer and presenter at Broadcast Education Association's annual conference, Las Vegas, NV.


OTHER

KELLY DAVIS

Kelly Davis was selected by the Public Relations Student Society of America to serve on the inaugural PRSSA National Faculty Advisory Council. The five council members will work closely with the PRSSA National Faculty Adviser and National Headquarters to connect with fellow chapter-level advisers, offer town hall-style virtual meetings, onboard new advisers, and more. Davis has served as the faculty adviser for the UofSC PRSSA chapter since 2017.

BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

AUGIE GRANT, ERIC ROBINSON (SJMC Faculty – Regulation), EHSAN MOHAMMADI (iSchool Faculty – Big Data), AMIR KARAMI (iSchool Faculty – Big Data), and YICHENG ZHU (PhD Alum – History of Communication Technology)

Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 18th edition, published April 2022 by Austin-based Technology Futures, Inc.

Citation: Grant, A. E. & Meadows, J. H. (Eds.) (2022). Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 18th edition. Technology Futures, Inc.

Abstract: The latest edition of the book begins with a section covering the fundamentals of communication technology in five chapterss that explain the communication technology ecosystem, its history, theories, structure, and regulations. Separate chapters then explore the background, recent developments, and current status of two dozen technologies in electronic mass media, computers, consumer electronics, telephony, and networking. The chapters are written by experts who provide a snapshot of an individual field. Together, these updates provide a broad overview of these industries and examine the role communication technologies play in our everyday lives. In addition to substantial updates to each chapter, the 18th edition includes first-ever chapters on surveillance and remote working and learning, plus updated user data in every chapter; an overview of industry structure, including recent and proposed mergers and acquisitions; and sidebars about people who have made a lasting contribution to communication technologies, with an emphasis on women and people of color.

Link: www.tfi-ctu.com


JOURNAL ARTICLES

JABARI EVANS

On April 1, I received acceptance letter for an article entitled "The Audacity of Clout(chasing)" in the International Journal of Communication. The article is a collaboration with Dr. Nancy Baym, whom was my mentor at Microsoft Research.

Citation: Evans, J.M. & Baym, N.K. (forthcoming, accepted 4/1/22) The Audacity of Clout(chasing):Digital Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago DIY Hip-Hop. International Journal of Communication.

Abstract: Though many scholars have theorized on the communication of Black youth in digital spaces, academic work has generally not sought artist perspectives of how their platformed creation might be connected to relational labor. Using observation and interviews with artists, artist managers and entrepreneurs, we examine relational practices of Hip-Hop youth on social media. We describe their work on social media toward acquiring “clout”—a digital form of influence self-described by emerging musicians as allowing them to leverage digital tools in building social and professional status, amplify authenticity, cultivate connections with fans, connect to friends and other cultural producers. In this study, we detail examples of three relational strategies that our respondents utilized to acquire clout: (a) corralling (b) capping, and (c) co-signing. To conclude, we argue Chicago’s Hip-Hop scene provides an example of why formal institutions and researchers need to rethink how race, class, gender, and geography influence the digital interactions of young people and how their social practices add to the understanding of the counter-publics arising from globalizing social media.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. Alumna), DENETRA WALKER (Ph.D. Alumna), and ROBERT MCKEEVER (SJMC Faculty)

Citation: McKeever, B.W., Choi, M., Walker, D., & McKeever, R. (2022). Gun violence as a public health issue: Media advocacy, framing and implications for communication. Newspaper Research Journal. https://doi.org/10.1177/07395329221090497

Abstract: Following a recent push to reframe gun violence as a public health issue, an online survey (N = 510) helped explore frame salience and frame adoption through the lens of media advocacy. Findings revealed that gun control and gun rights frames are salient, and television, social media and newspapers are the most popular sources of gun violence information. Individuals are being held responsible, while background checks were the most salient and adopted solution among Americans. Three gun rights organizations were the most salient organizations from media coverage related to gun violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON
Greenville, SC April 6-10

I presented on the Movement Rhetoric/Rhetoric's Movements panel at the Southern States Communication Association.

Abstract: This thematic panel takes up the question of how and why individuals, collectives, and institutions are moved, changed, and transformed through social communicative action. Participants will consider rhetorical scholarship, particularly new books and proposals in the University of South Carolina Press series of the same name, that examine the work of social justice and grassroots movements enacted via digital and embodied means. Additionally, participants will discuss social movement pedagogy along with cases of social communicative actions that are driven by corporate and economic interests and that can help us to better understand the rhetorical and material impediments to achieving the goals of justice and equity.

CANDICE EDRINGTON
Oxford, MS at The University of Mississippi, March 31-April 2

I was identified as a leading researcher in public relations and asked to present on the role of advocacy and social justice in PR at the inaugural IMC Connect! conference.

Abstract: This collaborative conference connected leading researchers and industry practitioners in the field of integrated marketing communication. The purpose of the conference was to provide critical insights related to crisis communication, big data, social media, public relations and advertising.

Link: https://express.adobe.com/page/lkQpxIR7Izolf/


SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was invited to give a virtual talk at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The title of his talk was Methodological Challenges of Studying Social Media. Leiden University ranks among the top 100 universities in the world.

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was invited to give a virtual talk at the IÉSEG School of Management. The title of his talk was Taming Health Dis/Misinformation on Social Media with Data Science Lash. IÉSEG School of Management is one of the top Business Schools in France, ranked 21st in the world by the Financial Times.

AWARDS/GRANTS

CLAYTON COPELAND
Dr. Copeland was appointed to Library of the Year Committee, National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled, Library of Congress

AMIR KARAMI and JACQUELINE PURTELL (Honors Student)
Jacqueline Purtell (Honors Student) and Dr. Karami (Mentor) received the Honors College Research Grant to analyze vaccine Dis/Misinformation on social media.

AMIR KARAMI
Dr. Karami received the International Healthcare 2021 Young Investigator Award. This award is for researchers who are under 40.

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/healthcare/awards/1326


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

BROOKE MCKEEVER and MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: McKeever, B.W., Choi, M. (2022). Philanthropic Crisis Communication. Invited book chapter published in Social Media and Crisis Communication, 2nd Edition, edited by Lucinda Austin and Yan Jin.

Link: https://www.routledge.com/Social-Media-and-Crisis-Communication/Jin-Austin/p/book/9780367489007


CONFERENCE PAPER

CANDICE EDRINGTON, TARA MORTENSEN (SJMC faculty), and ODERA ENZENNA ( SKMC Ph.D. student)
Citation: Edrington, C., Mortensen, T., Ezenna, O. (2022, March). Cultural Projection via #IAmABlackMan Challenge on Instagram. Presented at the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication Southeast Colloquium. Memphis, TN. Visual Communication Division. Research In Progress.

Abstract: The purpose of the proposed research study is to analyze Instagram photos posted by Black men with the #iamablackman hashtag challenge caption to assess the nature of cultural projection as visually and verbally communicated through Instagram, to examine how others interpret the cultural projection of Black men through these images, and to understand the overall sentiments surrounding the hashtag challenge.

BROOKE MCKEEVER, MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna), and HOLLY OVERTON (former SJMC faculty)
Citation: Choi, M., McKeever, B.W., Overton, H. (2022, May). A configurational approach to public relations research on prosocial behaviors. Research accepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) Conference in Paris, France.

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, March). Is your COVID-19 health information understood by adults in the general public? A content analysis of online resources published by the CDC and the WHO. In Proceedings of the International Congress of Medical Librarianship (ICML) and the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) Joint Conference. (In Press)

Abstract: Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major public health organizations worldwide, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and the World Health Organization (WHO), have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. It is essential to examine whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information distributed by these two major public health organizations facilitates health information access by the adults from the general public. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen’s everyday life information concepts and Dervin’s sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from American general public. This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed by the CDC and by the WHO. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems’ websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by targeted organizations.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

KEVIN HULL and LAUREN SCHWARTZ (former SJMC undergraduate student)
Citation: Hull, K., Billings, A. C., & Schwartz, L. (2021). The “Mighty Kacy” Effect? American Ninja Warrior and the elevation of women athletes. Journal of Sports Media, 16(2), 111-131.

Abstract: Contrary to previous sports studies demonstrating that sports within prime-time television programming minimize women athletes both in terms of exposure and the characterization of athletes when they are shown, the NBC-based athletic reality program American Ninja Warrior seemingly challenges such traditions. A study of a full season of the hit program reveals that only two significant dialogue differences emerged, disproportionately complimenting the speed of male competitors and the strength of female competitors. Otherwise, nonsignificant differences were found within the sample, perhaps revealing progress in the degree to which new renderings of sports media could be built on structures less premised in hegemonic masculinity.

Link: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/848009

KEVIN HULL, DENETRA WALKER (SJMC PhD student), KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO (SJMC faculty), AND MILES ROMNEY (former SJMC faculty)
Citation: Hull, K., Walker, D., Romney, M., & Pellizzaro, K. (accepted for publication). “Through our Prism”: A survey of Black local sports journalists’ work experiences and interactions with Black athletes. Journalism Practice.

Abstract: Black local television sports journalists throughout the United States were surveyed to discover how they view both their perceived place in the newsroom and media treatment of, and their own interactions with, Black athletes. The majority say that Black athletes are negatively stereotyped and that, as Black journalists, they have an easier time relating to and telling the story of the Black athlete. Using a thematic analysis of the open-ended comments, the authors found perspective, realization of racism, discriminatory hiring practices, and emotional labor to be common themes. Findings from this mixed methods study point to their belief that hiring more Black television sports journalists could improve coverage of Black athletes, but there are doubts that those job opportunities exist. When discussing their own experiences, the Black television sports journalists said there is some “tokenism” within television station hiring practices that makes it difficult for many of them to be hired. Practical implications for the future of sports journalism and newsroom diversity is discussed.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2022.2050468

BROOKE MCKEEVER and YUE ZHENG (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: Zheng, Y., & McKeever, B.W. (2022). Improving mobile donations: Exploring an advanced technology acceptance model, media preferences, and demographics of mobile donors. International Journal of Mobile Communications, 20(2), 242-261.

Abstract: Mobile donations, contributions made by sending a text message, have been possible for more than a decade and have led to successful fundraising campaigns such as one following an earthquake in Haiti in 2010. However, most mobile phone users have never used this technology and few campaigns have come close to the funds raised for Haiti earthquake relief. To examine people's motivations to make mobile donations, this study conducted a national survey with 994 USA-based respondents to explore an advanced version of the technology acceptance model. By comparing the findings between those who have previously made mobile donations and those who have not, perceived credibility was identified as a key factor to motivate non-donors. This research also explored how mobile donation motivations varied across multiple media preference and demographic variables, which contributes practical implications for non-profit organizations to improve future fundraising efforts.

Link: https://www.inderscienceonline.com/doi/abs/10.1504/IJMC.2022.121441

BROOKE MCKEEVER and MINHEE CHOI (Ph.D. alumna)
Citation: Choi, M., McKeever, B.W. (2022). Social media advocacy and gun violence: Applying the engagement model to nonprofit organizations' communication efforts. Public Relations Review. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2022.102173

Abstract: Applying the model of engagement, this study tests the effectiveness of social media advocacy strategies, framing, and mobilizing information related to nonprofit organizations’ communication about the issue of gun violence. An online experiment revealed successful social media advocacy strategies within the engagement model. Two key components of social media advocacy were identified: (1) public relations practitioners’ roles in shaping messages and mobilizing publics; (2) the important role of marginalized groups and individuals in issue amplification.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0363811122000285?dgcid=author

BROOKE MCKEEVER, JOHN A BERNHART (Arnold School of Public Health alumna), SARA WILCOX (Arnold School of Public Health faculty), and JENNIFER O’NEIL (Arnold School of Public Health faculty)
Citation: Bernhart, J.A., Wilcox, S., McKeever, B.W., Ehlers, D.K., O’Neill, J.R. (2022). A self-determination theory application to physical activity in charity sports events. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. DOI: 10.1177/15598276221077204

Abstract: Charity sports events, specifically 5K events, reach large numbers of people and may help promote physical activity (PA). Few studies exist applying Self-Determination Theory (SDT) to participation in these events. This study examined changes in SDT constructs of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness satisfaction in participants (n = 207) of charity 5K events and (2) examined relationships among post-event SDT constructs, PA, and intention to complete future events. Participants completed online surveys before and after a charity 5K event using the Psychological Needs Satisfaction in Exercise Scale, Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, and International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Repeated measures analysis of covariance analyzed the first purpose and regression the second. Competence satisfaction increased (P = .04) and relatedness satisfaction decreased (P = .04). Higher post-event relatedness satisfaction was associated with intention to complete future charity 5K events (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.11). Higher post-event autonomy, competence, and relatedness satisfaction and intrinsic motivation were associated with greater post-event MET-minutes of PA (all P < .05). Findings may be useful for promoting PA and helping organizations increase participation. Specifically, events facilitating relatedness among participants may lead to repeat participation as these events have opportunities to fulfill SDT outcomes and increase post-event PA.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/15598276221077204

BRETT ROBERTSON
Citation: Stephens, K. K., Powers, C., Robertson, B. W., Sperling, L., Collier, J., Tich, K., & Smith, W. R. (2022). Building more resilient communities with a wildfire preparedness drill in the U.S.: Individual and community influences and communication practices. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-5973.12402

ANLI XIAO
Citation: Overton, H. K. & Xiao, A. (accepted). Conscience-Driven Corporate Social Advocacy: Analyzing Moral Conviction and Perceived Motives as Predictors of Organization-Public Relationships. Corporate Communication: An International Journal


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

BROOKE MCKEEVER
Brooke was invited to be the Opening Plenary Speaker at the Second Annual SC Center for Rural and Primary Healthcare Learning Collaborative Meeting, which took place on March 4, 2022. Her presentation was titled, "Communicating Impact and Influencing Change."

FEILI TU-KEEFNER
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Lyons, D. R., Liu, J., Hobbs, A., & Smith, J. C. (2022, March 23-25). Librarians lead in times of crisis: Stop, drop & roll. To be presented at the Public Library Association Conference, Portland OR.

Abstract: Society today expects libraries to be not just information service providers, but to also serve as catalysts for community engagement. The mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation, preservation, and dissemination. When the pandemic hit the nation, the majority of libraries had to close their doors. Libraries nationwide took the opportunity to transform their service to various types of formats and continue the provision of essential information services to their user communities. Various types of innovative and virtual information services have been developed and implemented. This presentation covers how librarians have stepped up to being leaders to the communities they serve, especially focusing on how librarians have gone far and beyond to provide non-traditional library services to their communities. Several examples will be provided. Librarians’ leadership qualifications in time of crisis will be addressed. These qualifications are from the results of three situation-specific studies on the provision of disaster health-information services by public libraries. The significance of creating diversified workforces in libraries, as well as how to integrate equality, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the libraries’ strategic plans will be also addressed. The presentation will end with a discussion of what lessons have been learned from the pandemic.

Link: https://www.placonference.org/programs.cfm?session_key=9797E5FD-A986-572E-6BFE-AF31E51F6CAB&session_date=Thursday,%20Mar%2024,%202022

FEILI TU-KEEFNER and ABBY BRICKER (MLIS student)
Citation: Tu-Keefner, F., Hobbs, A., & Bricker, A. (2022, March 15-19). Is the COVID-19 health information that you provided understood by your general public users? A content analytical study. Presented at the International Congress of Medical Librarianship (ICML) and the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) Joint Conference, Pretoria, South Africa.

Abstract: Because uncertainty, great fear, conspiracy theories, and distrust are associated with the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to accurate and easy-to-understand information to help them act appropriately. Major public health organizations worldwide, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and the World Health Organization (WHO), have created web portals to rapidly release authoritative COVID-19 health information to a large population. It is essential to examine whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information distributed by these two major public health organizations facilitates health information access by the adults from the general public. The research design for this study is based on Savolainen's everyday life information concepts and Dervin's sense-making methodology. The research purposes are to 1) better understand the connections between readability levels and consumer health information comprehension; 2) investigate whether the authoritative COVID-19 health information provided can support the evidence-based health information access activities of adults from the general public. This study examines the levels of readability and comprehension of the COVID-19 health information distributed by the CDC and by the WHO. The sample populations analyzed are identified through accessing the COVID-19 health information shared on the public library systems’ websites of the twenty largest cities in the United States. Microsoft Office software is utilized for content analysis and to calculate the averages of the readability scores of the COVID-19 health information provided by targeted organizations.

Link: https://icml2022.org/programme

AWARDS/GRANTS

AMIR KARAMI, XIAOMING LI, and JIAJIA ZHANG

With multi-department collaborations, Dr. Amir Karami has received an NIH grant to mentor researchers at the intersection of social media, data science, and infectious diseases.

ALI ZAIN

Top Student Paper Award for "Online endorsed misinformation and climate change: using heuristic cues to assess perceived credibility of messages and sharing intentions" at the 47th Annual AEJMC Southeast Colloquium (SEC ’22) to be held in Memphis, United States on March 17-19, 2022.

Citation: Zain, A. (2022, March). Online endorsed misinformation and climate change: using heuristic cues to assess perceived credibility of messages and sharing intentions. 47th Annual AEJMC Southeast Colloquium (SEC ’22). Memphis, United States.


BOOK/BOOK CHAPTER

KEVIN HULL

My solo-authored textbook, Sports Broadcasting, was published a few weeks ago.

Citation: Hull, K. (2022). Sports Broadcasting. Human Kinetics.

Link: https://us.humankinetics.com/products/sports-broadcasting-with-hkpropel-access


CONFERENCE PAPER

ALI ZAIN and JUNGMI JUN

Global Comparison of COVID-19 Vaccination Sentiments and Emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 Countries presented at the National Big Data Health Science Conference (BDHS ’22). Columbia, United States.

Citation: Jun, J. and Zain, A. (2022, February). Global Comparison of COVID-19 Vaccination Sentiments and Emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 Countries. National Big Data Health Science Conference (BDHS ’22). Columbia, United States.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Paper accepted to the 72nd Annual ICA Conference in Paris, France: My research team and I have had a paper accepted to this year's upcoming ICA annual conference. The paper is entitled "The Paradoxical Big Non-Story: Traditional and Social Media Frames Surrounding Carl Nassib, the NFL’s First Openly Gay Player."

Citation: Moscowitz, L., Billings, A. C., Gentile, P., & Jackson, J. (2021). The Paradoxical Big Non-Story: Traditional and Social Media Frames Surrounding Carl Nassib, the NFL’s First Openly Gay Player. Paper accepted to 72nd Annual ICA Conference, Paris, France (forthcoming, May 2022).

Abstratct: In June of 2021, National Football League (NFL) defensive lineman Carl Nassib made history as the first openly gay, active professional football player to come out. Advancing research about news coverage of LGBT athletes, this paper employs content analysis to analyze the frames used in newspaper articles (n=195) and on social media (n=5,588 tweets) to report the story of Nassib’s coming out. Findings indicate overall support for Nassib’s coming out, as both newspapers and Twitter posts framed the story as a watershed moment and focused on celebrity support; however, personal attacks were more common on social media. Implications for how media cover gay athlete stories are discussed.

LEIGH MOSCOWITZ

Paper Presented at BEA 2022: My research team and I have had a paper accepted to the Broadcast Education Association's (BEA) 2022 conference in Las Vegas in April. The paper is entitled, "Well, He is Paid to be Violent...": How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents.

Citation: Brown, K., Billings, A., Moscowitz, L., & Lewis, M. (2021). "Well, He is Paid to be Violent…”: How Athlete Identity Alters Perceptions of Domestic Violence Incidents. Paper accepted to 2022 BEA Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV (forthcoming, April 2022).

Abstratct: The media coverage of domestic violence in professional sports does not carry equal weight; narratives of race, gender, class, and sexuality define which crimes get the most attention and how perpetrators and victims are portrayed. The purpose of this study is to determine if perceptions of violence related to race, gender and sport will impact audience reactions to domestic violence charges against an athlete.

JUNGMI JUN and ALI ZAIN

Citation: Jun, J., & Zain, A. (2022). Global comparison of ‘COVID-19 vaccination’ sentiments and emotions on Twitter: Findings from 192 countries. Presented at the SC Big Data Health Sciences Center Conference.

Abstract: Many countries show low COVID-19 vaccination rates despite their high levels of readiness and delivery of vaccines. Research suggests the public’s misperceptions, hesitancy, and negative emotions towards vaccines are psychological factors discouraging vaccination. At the individual level, a growing number of studies have revealed negative perceptual and behavioral outcomes of COVID-19 information exposure via social media where misinformation floods. Yet, there is a scarcity of research investigating social media discourses on COVID-19 vaccination and its association with vaccination rates at the national level. We compared COVID-19 vaccination related tweets among 192 countries in terms of the proportion of tweets (1) mentioning adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccine (e.g., death, blood clots), (2) negative sentiment (vs. positive), and (3) negative emotions (vs. joy). We also test the effects of such tweets and covariates (COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates, GDP, population size and density, literacy rate, democracy index, institutional quality, human development index) in predicting countries’ vaccination rates.

JUNGMI JUN, KIM JOONKYOUNG, OVERTON HOLLY, ROBERTSON BRETT, BELLA NANDINI, ZAIN, ALI, and PIACENTINE COLIN

Citation: Kim, J., Jun, J., Overton, H., Robertson, B., Bhalla, N., & Ciccarelli, C. (2022). Science, faith, and information sources as drivers of individuals' perceptions of COVID-19 risk and mask-wearing intention. Accepted to present at the International Communication Association Annual Conference. Paris. France [Hybrid].

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has led many countries to implement safety guidelines to prevent the spread of the virus. An online survey using a U.S. sample (N = 374) was conducted to investigate the determinants of individuals’ intention to adhere to COVID-19 safety measures such as wearing a mask. Results indicate that authoritative COVID-19 information sources (e.g., the CDC) were associated with individuals’ higher risk perceptions of COVID-19 and intention to wear a mask, whereas faith-based organizations as non-authoritative sources were negatively associated with risk perceptions and behavioral intentions. Individuals’ belief in science but not belief in God’s control over their health appeared as a positive predictor of risk perceptions and behavioral intentions.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

TARA MORTENSEN

Routine and Individual-Level Influences on Newspaper Front-Page Images: Wire Photographs, Staff Photojournalism, Race and Gender

Abstract: This study uncovers routine and individual-level influences upon the content of US front-page images. This examination is justified by a news-image environment increasingly dominated by a small number of central agencies and with a lack of photojournalist diversity. At the routine level, differences are assessed based on whether images are taken by an on-staff photojournalist or a wire photographer. At the individual level, differences are assessed based on the photographer’s race and gender. The visual content studied includes three general categories: photojournalistic news values (presence of people, activity of persons of people in the image, whether eye contact is portrayed, emotional hierarchy, and topic), representation (race and gender of people or persons in the image), and visual elevation (circulation of the image in which the image appears, image usage, and image topic). Results of the study show a number of significant routine-level differences, but fewer differences based on the individual characteristics of the photojournalist, which primarily pertain to the representation of subjects.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2022.2033635?scroll=top&needAccess=true

JABARI EVANS

I published this empirical paper in the Journal of Global Hip-Hop Studies on Chicago's controversial Drill Music scene. I argue that despite ambivalence over the promotion of violence, potential threats to their well-being on the streets and negative stereotypes of Black men within their communication, my respondents saw their promotional content creation on social media as a form of 'social hacking' (a creative means to pursuing upward social mobility) the music industry through the attention economy. I theorize two particular self-described labor practices (capping and corralling) to argue this point.

Citation: Evans, J. M. (2022). We (MOSTLY) Carry Guns for the Internet: Visibility Labour, Social Hacking and Chasing Digital Clout by Black Male Youth in Chicago’s Drill Rap Scene. Journal of Global Hip Hop Studies, 1(2), 227–47.

Abstract: Much negative attention has been given to the ‘drill’ music genre, a subgenre of gangsta rap that was born in Chicago’s underground hip hop scene in early 2010s. Previous scholarship has highlighted how social media has shifted how gang-affiliated youth in Chicago carefully manage their street reputations, communicate with peers and fuel gang rivalries through platformed creation. Yet still, in the context of drill, I argue that social media self-branding practices also provide these youth a way out of containment and sequestration to gain visibility in the music industry and empower their neighbourhoods. Based on interviews with drill recording artists and their support workers, I explore the content and character of their work, the centrality of work ethic to their racial identity construction and the way they use social media work to build and maintain status, authenticity and cultivate connections with fans, friends and other cultural producers. Bridging traditional theories of urban sociology with emerging new media scholarship, I suggest this group of artists is a representative case of how the digital practices of disadvantaged Black youth have typically gone mischaracterized in the literature. This study offers new insights into ‘capping’ as an important tenet to hip hop’s visibility labour on social media and how the ‘always on’ nature of digital labour adds another dimension to the typical utilization of street authenticity in narratives of hip hop music. This article concludes by illuminating the many deep contradictions and misconceptions about technological ingenuity, Black youth agency, hip hop culture and street credibility in urban communities.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1386/ghhs_00019_1


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

CANDICE EDRINGTON

I presented on a panel for the AEJMC's Public Relations Division Virtual Conference. The title of the panel was "Managing Collective Trauma in the PR Classroom".

Abstract: PR educators fill a variety of roles for students, one being a source of mental and emotional support in times of distress (Auger & Formentin, 2021; Madden & Del Rosso, 2021). As society reels from events such as the murder of George Floyd, violent storms and wildfires, the insurrection of the US Capitol, and a deadly pandemic, communities often experience collective trauma -- shared memories of, reactions to, and feelings towards societal events that affect everyone (Hirschberger, 2018). In terms of managing collective trauma, PR educators are shouldered with two central tasks in the PR classroom: 1) supporting students’ mental health through the events that influence individual and collective well-being and 2) helping students consider the role that PR plays in fostering the shared meaning that can help communities heal from collective trauma. This panel asks – how are we helping students navigate the collective stress and trauma the last two years have undoubtedly brought? How do PR and professional communication help us make meaning about what students and educators have experienced and how these experiences inform our pedagogy? What types of challenges have PR educators faced and how are they supporting one another? This panel spotlights PR educators who investigate risk/crisis, advocacy and social change, and dissensus/contentious issues to unpack what we can do to help students navigate the effects of collective trauma and help students forge paths forward to use PR for collective healing.

AWARDS/GRANTS

BRETT ROBERTSON

Winner of the 2021 National Communication Association (NCA) Communication and Aging Division Outstanding Dissertation Award

JUNGMI JUN, MIRANDA BUTLER (Honors Student and PR Major), and MEGHAN WHITTLE (Honors Student)

These students won Magellan Scholar award ($3,650) by the Office of Research. This funding will support their social media research project - "The New Frontier or a Billionaire’s Joy Ride? Artificial Intelligence Driven Analysis of Twitter Conversations of the SpaceX Company."

ROBERT MCKEEVER, JUNGMI JUN, JOON KYOUNG KIM (PhD alumnus), KAREN WILKERSHAM (School of Nursing), BRETT ROBERTSON, CHRISTOPHER NOLAND (PhD alumnus), and CARL CICCARELLI (PhD student)

Colorectal Cancer Prevention Network (CCPN) Research Grant

Citation: McKeever, R., Jun, J., Kim, J.K., Wikersham, K., Robertson, B., Noland, C., & Ciccarelli, C. (2022). Identifying Optimal Visual Narratives to Impact African American Men’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Awareness and Screening Uptake. $19,915 grant awarded by the Colorectal Cancer Prevention Network (CCPN).

JEFFREY WILLIAMS

CIEL grant for the Community of Practice

Creation of a pilot film that follows the journey of the students enrolled in Maymester at the Circus before, during and after the course.


CONFERENCE PAPER

YINGYING CHEN, JACOB LONG (SJMC faculty), JUNGMI JUN (SJMC faculty), SEI-HILL KIM (SJMC faculty), ALI ZAIN (PhD student), and COLIN PIACENTINE (PhD student)

Citation: Chen, Y., Long, J., Jun J., Kim, S., Zain, A., & Piacentine, C. (2022). Anti-intellectualism amid the Covid-19 pandemic: The dynamics of anti-Fauci discourse on Twitter. Paper accepted by the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference (political communication session), Paris, France.

Abstract: The aim of this study is to understand anti-intellectual discourse and their dynamics and sources on social media. Anti-intellectualism, defined as a generalized distrust of experts and intellectuals has become a major obstacle for the public compliance with health policies and behaviors recommended by experts and governments. However, few studies investigate how people express anti-intellectualism and how such speech evolves over time on social media. Analyzing anti-Fauci tweets as a case study, we showed the presence of three types of discourses: people-scientist antagonism, delegitimizing science-based decision-making sovereignty, and delegitimizing truth-speaking sovereignty in anti-Fauci speech being shared on Twitter. Delegitimizing science-based decision-making sovereignty remained to be the major anti-intellectual discourse over time.

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., Dong, C., Rodgers, K., Thorson, K., Baykaldi, S. & Cotter, K. (2022). Local civic information beyond the news: Computational identification of civic content on social media. Paper presented at the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference, Paris, France.

Abstract: Local news media used to be the central source for local civic information. As local news organizations dilapidated, the rise of Facebook provides infrastructure opportunities for non-news organizations to directly engage citizens. Thus, non-news organizations on Facebook shift the local civic information infrastructure as sources of civic information. The transformation in information ecology and infrastructure is missing in the current definition of civic information, which still perceives local news as local civic information. Using a combination of computational methods and human coding, we first classify distinct types of civic information in the Facebook posts of multiple types of community organizations, both news and non-news, in one mid-sized Midwestern U.S. city. We use bipartite network analysis to examine the connection between organization type and the production of types of civic information. We highlight the many ways that local organizations collaboratively promote the civic capacity of local residents, but meanwhile they also produce non-civic information, potentially to adapt to the platform for more public attention.

YINGYING CHEN and CINDY YU CHEN (PhD student)

Citation: Yuan, S., Chen, Y., Vojta, S., & Chen, CY. (2022). More aggressive, more retweets? Exploring the effects of aggressive climate change messages on Twitter. Paper presented at the 72nd Annual International Communications Association Conference, Paris, France.

Abstract: When an increasing amount of polarized and aggressive tweets of climate change are observed, limited is known as how they spread on Twitter. This study focuses on how different types of network gatekeepers use aggressive styles and how the styles affect their propagation. The current study employed a computational method and identified 951 influential accounts from 7.25 million tweets about climate change in 2019 and 2020. We analyzed their use of aggression and politicized cues, and the relationship with the volume of retweets. Results showed that even though aggressive tweets were a small portion of their overall tweets about climate change, aggressive tweets were more likely to be politicized and retweeted. Additionally, different types of accounts (e.g., news media, political elites, individuals) would use aggression differently. The findings of this study build on the current knowledge in the use of aggression online and provide practical implications for environmental communicators. 

JABARI EVANS

I presented a paper in progress for the African American Communication and Culture Division at the annual Meeting of the National Communication Association in Seattle, Washington.

Citation: Evans, J.M. (2021). Clout(chasers): Relational Labor and Empowerment Strategies of Black Youth in Chicago’s DIY Rap Scene. Working paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association. Seattle, WA. November 18.

I see “clout chasing” as a techno-social competition in the marketplace of attention. For Black youth, clout chasing is self-expression that involves creatively asserting one’s presence in digital spaces that were not designed with them in mind. As a phenomenon, clout-chasing is built around youth sharing their everyday lives online in hopes of creating an engaging reputation within social media platforms. I use Clout-chasing as a framework to understand how Black youth use "underground" labor practices in the innovation economy to expose their creative talents.

ROBERT MCKEEVER

Citation: Holman L. & McKeever, R. (2022, May). Climate Change Storytelling: The Transportation Effect of Vividness and Exemplification in Video Narratives on Perceptions of Risk, Attitudes and Intended Behaviors. Paper accepted for presentation at the 72nd Annual International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Paris, France

KIM THOMPSON

This presentation highlights recently collected data by Paul, Yadamsuren, and Thompson exploring ways COVID work-from-home restrictions have affect digital inclusion, digital tech adoption, digital use, and digital confidence.

Citation: Paul, A., Yadamsuren, B. & Thompson, K. M. (2021). Using Factors for Digital Inclusion to Assess Changes in Digital Use Behavior During COVID Times. Presented at the 8th PAN IIM World Management Conference: Responsible Business for Sustainable Development. 16-18 December, 2021 at Indian Institute of Management--Kozhikode, India.

Abstract: During this sudden dramatic transformation owing to the pandemic normal lives were disrupted and personal spaces merged in new ways with the professional. Considerable attention has been drawn to the need for understanding in what ways the pandemic has affected the use of digital media in everyday lives of people. Literature highlights the COVID-19 home in context of the digitized work arrangements and the need to look at unequal burdens of household work along with issues of digital access including Wi-Fi. Businesses are also reshaping their work practices in new ways after experiencing remote work during the pandemic. The purpose of our study is to explore the impact of COVID-19 in everyday lives of working professionals in India applying a digital inclusion framework (Thompson & Paul, 2020) using an online survey method. The findings of our study can help in understanding the new normal with respect to digital use in the lives of individuals owing to the pandemic that will be of interest to governments and organizations to formulate policies towards effective digital inclusion for citizens and better work productivity by employees during stressful times.


JOURNAL ARTICLES

SHANNON BOWEN and YICHING ZHU (SJMC doctoral graduate)

Citation: Yicheng Zhu, Shannon A. Bowen & Xiangming Lyu (2022): Messenger Nationality, Media Skepticism, and Crisis Communication Effectiveness: Huawei’s YouTube Messages as Perceived in the U.S., International Journal of Strategic Communication, DOI: 10.1080/1553118X.2021.2014499

Abstract: This study examines the effect of messenger nationality on the credibility perception of YouTube sources in the theoretical context of situational crisis communication theory (SCCT). An online survey experiment with a quota U.S. voter sample (N = 354) showed that Russian nationality decreases source credibility perception in comparison to U.K. and control conditions, while the latter two showed no differences. Although skepticism in domestic media dampens such an effect, path analyses also showed that such impact can be extended to the effectiveness of an MNC’s (i.e., Huawei) global crisis communication efforts in the U.S. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/1553118X.2021.2014499 

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., & Wang, L. (2022). Misleading political advertising fuels incivility online: A social network analysis of 2020 US presidential election campaign video comments on YouTube. Computers in Human Behavior, 107202.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2022.107202

Abstract: In the 2020 U.S. presidential election, increasing misinformation-based political advertisements have circulated on video-sharing platforms, such as YouTube and challenged healthy political communication. This study investigates the social contagion of political incivility stemming from a misinformation-based campaign video posted by former U.S. President Donald Trump. Specifically, using dynamic network analysis and exponential random graph modeling, we explore and test three mechanisms (imitation, intergroup interaction, and reciprocity) for their role in the contagion of online political incivility. Contrary to previous findings, we show that online political incivility is not a fleeting occurrence but recurrent and sustaining given YouTube's promotional algorithms. Reciprocity is the primary mechanism that predicts the formation of uncivil politically-based interactions in YouTube comments. The findings provide implications for YouTube's content moderation mechanism and underline the need to reconsider the potential harm of promoting misinformation-based political campaigns through this platform.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2022.107202

YINGYING CHEN

Citation: Chen, Y., Thorson, K., & Lavaccare, J. (2022). Convergence and Divergence: The Evolution of Climate Change Frames Within and Across Public Events. International Journal of Communication, 16, 23.

Abstract: The framing of climate change in the news over time plays a crucial role in shaping public understanding of the issue. This study examines variation in the framing of climate change in global news media across 12 high-attention climate events from 2012 to 2015. We show that events and journalistic practice interact to generate a mix of frames that collectively construct climate change discourse. Using topic modeling and network analysis, we identified six frames used in the media coverage of climate during this period. We trace the usage of these frames and show that framings related to policy struggles and economic concerns have become the “default” framing of climate change across news media. Other framings of the climate issue appear only when particular public events happen. The findings suggest that frame evolution is a socially constructed process influenced by journalistic routines and triggering events.

Link: https://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/viewFile/17609/3629

CANDICE EDRINGTON

Social movements are similar to public relations campaigns in that building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships are vital for their success. This article analyzes the website homepage of the Black Lives Matter movement to assess how they build relationships with their publics.

Citation: Edrington, C. (2021). Information, identification, or both? A rhetorical analysis of how BLM uses their official website. The Pennsylvania Communication Annual, 77(2), 11-30.

Abstract: The purpose of this analysis is to examine the rhetorical dimension of Black Lives Matter’s website homepage in an effort to uncover how identification is articulated in and through the website. This rhetorical analysis focuses on the larger issues of how social movements use digital tools to help advance their goals and achieve action.

JUNGMI JUN, JUN J. ZHANG (PhD alumna), ALI ZAIN (PhD student), and EHSAN MOHAMMADI (iSchool faculty)

Social media discourse of the FDA’s MRTP authorization of IQOS. Substance Use and Misuse.

Citation: Jun, J., Zhang, N., Zhane, A., & Mohammadi, E. (2022).

Abstract: Background: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized the marketing of the IQOS tobacco heating system as a modified risk tobacco product (MRTP) in July 2020, permitting its ‘reduced exposure’ marketing. This decision is accompanied by much controversy among the global health community. We provide a preliminary analysis of Twitter conversations regarding the MRTP authorization of IQOS by identifying the authors, valence towards the policy decision, source of cited link, and focused topic. Methods: We analyzed 548 tweets mentioning MRTP posted between July 2016 (when PMI submitted the proposal) and October 2020. Results: We found a higher proportion of pro-MRTP valence (25.4%) than anti-MRTP (16.2%). Nearly half of the tweets (47.2%) expressing personal opinions presented pro-MRTP valence (vs. anti-MRTP = 23.9%). The FDA website was more frequently cited in pro-MRTP tweets (30.8% vs. anti = 4.8%), while tobacco control advocates’ websites were cited only in anti-MRTP tweets (77.4% vs. pro = 0). Pro-MRTP valence appeared more frequently in tweets mentioning health (53.1% vs. anti =38.5%) and cessation (100% vs. anti = 0). Nearly 42% of tweets showed a bot score greater than .43, indicating a possibility of automation. Conclusion: Continuous efforts are needed to surveil the industry’s attempts to create a climate of false consensus and circulate misinformation regarding MRTP on social media, as well as to assist non-scientific audiences’ understanding of MRTP.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/UXNVNZVCQXUDCGENFA5M/full?target=10.1080/10826084.2021.2019777

AMIR KARAMI, PARISA BOZORGI (Arnold School of Public Health), DWAYNE E. PORTER (Arnold School of Public Health) and JAN M. EBERTH (Arnold School of Public Health)

This study published by Drug and Alcohol Dependence (Impact Factor: 4.492) aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques.

Citation: Bozorgi, P., Porter, D. E., Eberth, J. M., Eidson, J. P., & Karami, A. (2021). The leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose: a mixed machine learning and spatial approach. Drug and alcohol dependence, 109143.

Abstract:

Background: Drug overdose is a leading cause of unintentional death in the United States and has contributed significantly to a decline in life expectancy during recent years. To combat this health issue, this study aims to identify the leading neighborhood-level predictors of drug overdose and develop a model to predict areas at the highest risk of drug overdose using geographic information systems and machine learning (ML) techniques.

Method: Neighborhood-level (block group) predictors were grouped into three domains: socio-demographic factors, drug use variables, and protective resources. We explored different ML algorithms, accounting for spatial dependency, to identify leading predictors in each domain. Using geographically weighted regression and the best-performing ML algorithm, we combined the output prediction of three domains to produce a final ensemble model. The model performance was validated using classification evaluation metrics, spatial cross-validation, and spatial autocorrelation testing.

Results: The variables contributing most to the predictive model included the proportion of households with food stamps, households with an annual income below $35,000, opioid prescription rate, smoking accessories expenditures, and accessibility to opioid treatment programs and hospitals. Compared to the error estimated from normal cross-validation, the generalized error of the model did not increase considerably in spatial cross-validation. The ensemble model using ML outperformed the GWR method.

Conclusion: This study identified strong neighborhood-level predictors that place a community at risk of experiencing drug overdoses, as well as protective factors. Our findings may shed light on several specific avenues for targeted intervention in neighborhoods at risk for high drug overdose burdens.

Link: https://doi-org.pallas2.tcl.sc.edu/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.109143

VANESSA KITZIE

Citation: Kitzie, V., Connaway, L.S., & Radford, M.L. (2021). “I’ve already Googled it and I can’t understand it”: User’s perceptions of virtual reference and social question-answering sites. Reference and User Services Quarterly, 59(3/4), 204-215.

Abstract: For librarians to continually demonstrate superior and high-quality service, they must meet the needs of current and potential users. One way that librarians have met the needs of users is by expanding their service offerings online via virtual reference services (VRS). This expansion is particularly critical in the current time of COVID-19. To provide high-quality VRS service, librarians can learn from social question-answering (SQA) sites, whose popularity reflect changing user expectations, motivations, use, and assessment of information. Informed by interviews with 51 users and potential users of both platforms this research examines how strengths from SQA can be leveraged in VRS, and what can be learned from SQA practices to reach potential library users. This study represents one of the few comparisons between VRS and SQA that exist in the literature.

Link: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/rusq/article/view/7721

KIRSTIN PELLIZZARO

By measuring the psychological distance to COVID-19, either as a health or economic risk to one's self, we were able to explain why people accept rumored messages to be true. Implications for misinformation and rumor psychology research are discussed.

Citation: Kwon KH, Pellizzaro K, Shao C, Chadha M. “I Heard That COVID-19 Was...”: Rumors, Pandemic, and Psychological Distance. American Behavioral Scientist. January 2022. doi:10.1177/00027642211066026

Abstract: The spread of misinformation through a variety of communication channels has amplified society’s challenge to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. While existing studies have examined how misinformation spreads, few studies have examined the role of psychological distance in people’s mental processing of a rumor and their propensity to accept self-transformed narratives of the message. Based on an open-ended survey data collected in the U.S. (N = 621) during an early phase of the pandemic, the current study examines how psychological distance relates to the transformation and acceptance of conspiratorial narratives in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Two instances of misinformation are examined, both of which were widely heard at the time of data collection: the role of (a) Bill Gates and (b) government during the outbreak of the pandemic. This study uses topic modeling techniques to capture distinctive topical attributes that emerged from rumor narratives. In addition, statistical analyses estimate the psychological distance effects on the salience of topical attributes of a rumor story and an individual’s propensity to believe them. Findings reveal that psychological distance to the threats of COVID-19 influences how misinformation evolves through word-of-mouth, particularly in terms of who is responsible for the pandemic and why the world finds itself in the current situation. Psychological distance also explains why people accept the message to be true. Implications for misinformation and rumor psychology research, as well as avenues for future research, are discussed.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/00027642211066026?fbclid=IwAR1wJI1z38zq6dpo2jnyaoLY_IJdZF6qx2VOHeBv1zhAiJr_M-3k5bWeb1w

TOM REICHERT

Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Advertising.

Citation: Choi, Hojoon, Kyunga Yoo, Tom Reichert, and Temple Northup (forthcoming). Sexual Ad Appeals in Social Media: Effects and Influences of Cultural Difference and Sexual Self-Schema. International Journal of Advertising.

LINWAN WU

Commenting on Brand Posts during a Crisis: The Relationship between Context-Induced Moods and Brand Message Processing across Three Social Media Platforms

Citation: Feng, Y., & Wu, L. (2021). Commenting on brand posts during a crisis: The relationship between context-induced moods and brand message processing. Journal of Interactive Advertising. DOI: 10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060

Abstract: Within the context of COVID-19, this study examines the relationship between context-induced moods and consumers’ responses to two different types of brand posts on social media: profit-driven posts and public-driven posts. Using both social media data (24,578 user comments on 14 brand posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) and survey data (356 subjects recruited from Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk), we found that across all three social media platforms (i.e., Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter), the more negative mood one was in when using a social media platform during the pandemic, the more likely one would leave a comment to praise the company endorser of the public-driven post (comment type 5) as opposed to leaving a comment to discuss serious issues, shedding light on the prediction of negative-state relief model. By contrast, across all three social media platforms, there is no relationship between context-induced moods and types of comments people leave on a profit-driven brand post. We provide theoretical, practical, and methodological implications for future research.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15252019.2021.1994060 


PANELS/PRESENTATIONS

LINWAN WU

How the public and consumers respond to AI’s involvement in advertising.

Invited virtual presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University.

Citation: Wu, L. (November 2021). How the public and consumers respond to AI’s involvement in advertising. Invited presentation at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Intelligence Science and Advertising Development, Shanghai International Studies University. Online.


BOOK CHAPTER

KIM THOMPSON and CLAYTON A. COPELAND

Equity, diversity, and inclusion in the LIS education and practice sectors: Creating accessible learning environments and informing social justice through universal design. In B. Mehra (Ed.), Social Justice Design and Implementation in Library and Information Science. Routledge.

Citation: Copeland, C. A. & Thompson, K. M. (2022). Equity, diversity, and inclusion in the LIS education and practice sectors: Creating accessible learning environments and informing social justice through universal design. In B. Mehra (Ed.), Social Justice Design and Implementation in Library and Information Science (pp. 190-201). Routledge.

Abstract: Social justice concepts can play a pivotal, transformational role in Library and Information Science (LIS) education and practice. Universal design – or design focused on meeting the needs of everyone, regardless of variabilities -- is one framework that can enhance the experience for all. This chapter provides a pedagogical approach to inclusion and accessibility in the LIS sector, providing practical examples of approaches to social justice in course design and delivery through a focus on physical equity, intellectual diversity, and social inclusion. This pedagogical model draws upon the core principles of Universal Design for Learning, and will not only ensure that more students in our programs can be successful in the learning environment, but also that the integration and modeling of these principles for course design throughout the curriculum ultimately can have pervasive social impacts and resultant community involvement in LIS practice, research, education, policy development, service design, and program implementation.


OTHER

KEVIN HULL

Kevin has been named to the editorial board of the International Journal of Sport Communication.

AMIR KARAMI

Dr. Karami was selected as the editor for the Open-Access Special Issue "Applications of Social Media Analytics for Health Informatics" for Healthcare (IF:2.645 & Indexed in PubMed). The first review would be done in less than one month. While the due date is Aug 1, 2022, Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted).

Link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/healthcare/special_issues/social_media_analytics

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